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iPad’s dominance of tablet usage, even 1.5 years later, is astounding
Analyzing Apple’s product cycles: Why the iPhone 4S shouldn’t surprise you
The focus is off on this photo — shot at Steve Jobs’ last Apple keynote, this past June at WWDC — but I love the expression on Steve’s face as he takes back the slide clicker from Scott Forstall for a few minutes, to unveil iCloud.
John Gruber made a prescient observation during that event: “He’s here, but this is the first post-Steve keynote.”
I don’t know if Steve or anyone at Apple knew that day that it would actually be Jobs’ last keynote. But in hindsight, it was a wonderful handoff.

The focus is off on this photo — shot at Steve Jobs’ last Apple keynote, this past June at WWDC — but I love the expression on Steve’s face as he takes back the slide clicker from Scott Forstall for a few minutes, to unveil iCloud.

John Gruber made a prescient observation during that event: “He’s here, but this is the first post-Steve keynote.”

I don’t know if Steve or anyone at Apple knew that day that it would actually be Jobs’ last keynote. But in hindsight, it was a wonderful handoff.

I’m happy that I got to see Steve speak in person once, this past June at WWDC. This is a photo I took that day.

I’m happy that I got to see Steve speak in person once, this past June at WWDC. This is a photo I took that day.

Why today’s iPhone event is so important
What should Apple do with the iPod?
Will Android’s market share ever beat Google’s search share?
On paper, it certainly seems possible: Over the past year, Android has risen to 42% of the market from 17%. If Google maintains the same trajectory for another year, it could reach 67%. But it’s more complicated than that.

Will Android’s market share ever beat Google’s search share?

On paper, it certainly seems possible: Over the past year, Android has risen to 42% of the market from 17%. If Google maintains the same trajectory for another year, it could reach 67%. But it’s more complicated than that.

It has now been 500 days since my iPad 3G arrived at the end of April, 2010. So, as I did after 100 days — when it was my “favorite” computer — and after 300 days — when I barely used it anymore — I’m going to write a bit about how it fits into my life today and what that means.

In short: I use it every day for about 30 to 60 minutes, mostly at home. I use it on long trips. I think it is the future of computing. But I still prefer my MacBook Air for almost everything besides reading in bed or watching videos.

This isn’t a brand-new phenomenon, but it’s worth repeating and re-emphasizing: What makes Apple so successful today — and so threatening to its competitors — isn’t just its design and engineering capabilities. It’s the fact that Apple is beating its rivals on price, too, something that once seemed inconceivable.

Apple: The next chapter
Tim Cook’s biggest challenge as CEO will be to continue scaling Apple as it experiences rapid growth.
It wouldn’t be insane for Apple to have to ship 500 million units per year by the end of the decade. So Tim Cook will have to figure out how to become the type of company that can ship 500 million gadgets per year — from product design to iCloud server infrastructure to manufacturing and sales.

Apple: The next chapter

Tim Cook’s biggest challenge as CEO will be to continue scaling Apple as it experiences rapid growth.

It wouldn’t be insane for Apple to have to ship 500 million units per year by the end of the decade. So Tim Cook will have to figure out how to become the type of company that can ship 500 million gadgets per year — from product design to iCloud server infrastructure to manufacturing and sales.